Icy formations along highway at higher altitudes
Icy formations along highway at higher altitudes

It sounds like a cliché, but, at the same time, it is so true!  Where is the time going?  I don’t believe it can go any faster, can it?  The weeks are spinning by, and I am still spending a great deal of my time reading and learning from other fulltime RVers.  There are a few favorite bloggers I follow religiously and look forward to meeting them down the road sometime.  YouTube and Pinterest are great resources for everything RV; the learning opportunities are without end.  Forums are a great way to get answers to individual questions, and you usually hear from several folks, so one is able to weed out the most suitable answers.  This RV community is very caring!  I am so blessed to be a part of this community.

Small Episcopal Church
Small Episcopal Church

SchoolhouseNext week, I leave for Macon, Georgia, where I will be joining a build with Habitat for Humanity.  Directions and introductions have started pouring in, so I’m getting very excited.  I have actually signed up for a second build later in February in Vero Beach, Florida.  I’m not very familiar with the Atlantic Coast, and as much as I love the ocean, it should be a wonderful experience.  I’ll keep you posted on both builds.  Please pray for safety…

Yesterday was a near perfect day!  The weather finally decided to leave the wet behind and gave us nearly 60 degrees of warmth.  My sister, brother-in-law, and I drove just over an hour to Rugby, TN to visit this small town founded as an experimental Utopian colony in 1880 by author Thomas Hughes. It is located on the Upper Cumberland Plateau of Tennessee.  Rugby is quite small, but what a gem!  All buildings are required to be Victorian by design, and all are very earthy in their soft paint pallets.

Hughes’ vision was to create a colony where the unemployed second sons of the English gentry would have an opportunity to own land and be free of the social and moral ills plaguing English cities at that time.  Materialism was to be replaced with the ideals of equality and cooperation espoused in Hughes’ own work, Tom Brown’s School Days.  The vision failed in reality.  Typhoid, land title suits, and the lack of experience and knowledge to farm this new country all contributed to its demise.  By 1887 most of the original colonists had either died or moved away.  A few hardy souls remained, and later in the 1960s restoration of the original design began in earnest.  In 1972, Rugby Colony’s historic area was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  (Information from Wikipedia.)

Winter hours prevented our visiting the insides of the closed historic buildings, but walking the grounds was really wonderful.  Building up an appetite, we headed to the Harrow Road Café for lunch, and we were delighted with the special of the day, Salisbury Steak, mashed potatoes, and corn.  The cornmeal muffins were excellent, and then the piece de resistance:  buttermilk coconut pie!  Yes, we splurged!  We were served by near identical twin sisters.  In all, a great experience with a lot of small town flavor.

Harrow Road Cafe
Harrow Road Cafe

We followed signs to the Obed Wild and Scenic River, which we visited after lunch.  We got a chance to speak with a young Norwegian who was making his first kayak trip on the white waters of the river.  He pulled out at the point we stopped to watch, as the river was going to be a little more treacherous further on.  He pointed us to the lookout far above and encouraged us to drive to the point to see the view.  Outstanding!  All in all, a pretty perfect day!

Moment of grace:  today I am thankful for good weather, new experiences, and the dreams of others, whether they succeed or not.

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